The 2018 Golden Globes awards turn out to be a historic night, is the first since the exploxion of the ‘Me Too’ movement, many celebrities showed their solidarity by wearing black, calling it the black carpet to show support for the #metoomovement. With a red carpet dyed black by actresses dressed in a color-coordinated statement, the Golden Globes were transformed into an A-list expression of female empowerment in the post-Harvey Weinstein era.

Oprah Winfrey led the charge.

“For too long women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men,” said Winfrey, accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement. “But their time is up. Their time is up!”

More than any award handed out Sunday at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, Winfrey’s speech, which was greeted by a rousing, ongoing standing ovation, encapsulated the “Me Too” mood at an atypically powerful Golden Globes. The night — usually one reserved for more carefree partying — served as Hollywood’s fullest response yet to the sexual harassment scandals that have roiled the film industry and laid bare its gender inequalities.

With a cutting stare, presenter Natalie Portman followed Winfrey’s speech by introducing, as she said, “the all-male” nominees for best director.

The movie that many believe speaks most directly to the current moment — “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” about a mother avenging the rape and murder of her daughter — emerged as the night’s top film. It won best picture, drama, best actress, drama, for Frances McDormand, best supporting actor for Sam Rockwell and best screenplay for writer-director Martin McDonagh.

Accepting her award, McDormand granted she was befuddled at the identities of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, but gave them credit. “At least they managed to elect a female president,” she said. She added that the evening indeed had a special feeling.

“Trust me, the women in this room tonight are not here for the food,” said McDormand.

Host Seth Meyers opened the night by diving straight into material about the sex scandals. “Good evening ladies and remaining gentlemen,” he began. In punchlines on Weinstein — “the elephant not in the room” — Kevin Spacey and Hollywood’s deeper gender biases, Meyers scored laughs throughout the ballroom, and maybe a sense of release.

“For the male nominees in the room tonight, this is the first time in three months it won’t be terrifying to hear your name read out loud,” said Meyers.

The first award of the night, perhaps fittingly, went to one of Hollywood’s most powerful women: Nicole Kidman, for her performance in HBO’s “The Big Little Lies,” a series she and Reese Witherspoon also produced. Kidman chalked the win up to “the power of women.”

“Big Little Lies” won a leading four awards, including best limited series and best supporting actress for Laura Dern. Like seven other female stars, Dern walked the red carpet with a women’s rights activist as part of an effort to keep the Globes spotlight trained on sexual harassment. Dern was joined by farmworker advocate Monica Ramirez, Michelle Williams with “Me Too” founder Tarana Burke, and Meryl Streep with domestic worker advocate Ai-jen Poo.

“May we teach all of our children that speaking out without fear of retribution is our new North Star,” said Dern, accepting her Globe.

Other winners continued the theme. Amazon’s recently debuted “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” about a 1950s housewife who takes up stand-up comedy, won best TV series comedy, and best actress for Rachel Brosnahan. Elisabeth Moss, accepting an award for her performance in Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale,” movingly dedicated her award to Margaret Atwood, whose book the show is based on. “The Handmaid’s Tale” later added the award for best TV series, drama.

“We no longer live in the blank white spaces at the edge of print,” said Moss, referencing Atwood’s prose. “We no longer live in the gaps between the stories. We are the stories in print and we are writing the stories ourselves.”

Hollywood’s awards season is seen as wide open. And though the Globes have little correlation with the Oscars, a handful of movies came away with big wins. Greta Gerwig’s mother-daughter tale “Lady Bird” won best picture, comedy or musical, and best actress honors for Saoirse Ronan. Guillermo del Toro’s Cold War-era fantasy “The Shape of Water” won for its score and del Toro’s directing. The emotional Mexican-born filmmaker wiped back tears and managed to quiet the music that urged him off.

 

Notably left empty-handed were Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” Jordan Peele’s horror sensation “Get Out” and Steven Spielberg’s “The Post,” starring Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep. At the top of the show, Meyers alluded to Spielberg’s film’s awards-season bona fides, feigned to present an armful of Globes before the show even started.

The Globes had long been the stomping grounds of disgraced mogul Weinstein, whose downfall precipitated allegations against James Toback, Spacey and many others. Weinstein presided over two decades of Globes winners and was well-known for his savvy manipulation of the 89-member press association.

Though it bills itself as Hollywood’s biggest party, the Golden Globes struck a slightly more formal, Oscar-like tone, complete with moments of appreciation for movie legends. Kirk Douglas, 101, appearing with his daughter-in-law, Catherin Zeta-Jones, received a warm standing ovation.

Best actor in a comedy or musical went to James Franco for his performance as the infamous “The Room” filmmaker Tommy Wiseau. Franco dragged his co-star and brother, Dave, to the stage and called up Wiseau. When the Wiseau, wearing his trademark sunglasses, got to the stage, he moved for the microphone before Franco turned him back. “Whoa, whoa, whoa,” said Franco as the audience chuckled.

Gary Oldman, considered by some to be the best actor front runner, won for his Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour,” edging out newcomer Timothee Chalamet (“Call Me By Your Name”) and Hanks.

Best foreign language film went to Germany’s “In the Fade.” Allison Janney took best supporting actress in a comedy for the Tonya Harding tale “I, Tonya.” Aziz Ansari took best actor in a comedy series for his Netflix show “Master of None.”

Best animated film went to the Pixar release “Coco.” Pixar co-founder John Lasseter is taking a “six-month sabbatical” after acknowledging “missteps” in his workplace behavior. Backstage, “Coco” director Lee Unkrich was asked about changes at Pixar. “We can all be better,” he said. “We have been taking steps and continue to move forward to create art.”

Sunday night’s black-clad demonstration was promoted by the recently formed Time’s Up: an initiative of hundreds of women in the entertainment industry —including Streep, Williams, Dern and Winfrey — who have banded together to advocate for gender parity in executive ranks and provide legal defense aid for sexual harassment victims.

Ashley Judd, the first big name to go on record with her Weinstein experience, and Salma Hayek, who last month penned an op-ed about her nightmare with Weinstein, arrived together.

It was just another illustration of how the “MeToo” reckoning that has plowed through Hollywood has upended awards season. Among the nominees Sunday was Christopher Plummer, who was brought in at the last minute to erase Spacey from “All the Money in the World. “But the night belonged to women.

Here are the movies and TV shows that received the top awards.

Movies
Best motion picture, drama: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy: “Lady Bird”

Best director, motion picture: Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama: Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama: Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy: Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy: James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in any motion picture: Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in any motion picture: Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best screenplay, motion picture: Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best motion picture, animated: “Coco”

Best motion picture, foreign language: “In the Fade”

Best original score, motion picture: Alexandre Desplat, “The Shape of Water”

Best original song, motion picture: “This Is Me” — “The Greatest Showman”

Television
Best television series, drama: “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Hulu

Best performance by an actress in a television series, drama: Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama: Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”

Best television series, musical or comedy: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” Amazon

Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy: Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy: Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

Best television limited series or motion picture made for television: “Big Little Lies,” HBO

Best performance by an actress in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”

Best performance by an actor in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Ewan McGregor, “Fargo”

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Laura Dern, “Big Little Lies”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Alexander Skarsgard, “Big Little Lies”

¡Los Globos de Oro 2018 una noche histórica! teñida en negro, la noche perteneció a las mujeres +lista completa de ganadores

Los premios Golden Globes de 2018 se convirtieron en una noche histórica, es la primera desde la explosión del movimiento ‘Yo también’, muchas celebridades mostraron su solidaridad al vestirse de negro, llamándola la alfombra negra para mostrar su apoyo al #metoomovement. Con una alfombra roja teñida de negro por las actrices vestidas con una declaración de colores coordinados, los Globos de Oro se transformaron en una expresión de una lista de empoderamiento femenino en la era posterior a Harvey Weinstein.

Oprah Winfrey dirigió el cargo.

“Durante demasiado tiempo, las mujeres no han sido escuchadas o creídas si se han atrevido a decir su verdad al poder de esos hombres”, dijo Winfrey, quien aceptó el Premio Cecil B. DeMille por sus logros de por vida. “Pero se les acabó el tiempo. ¡Se les acabó el tiempo!”

Más que cualquier premio entregado el domingo en Beverly Hilton Hotel en Beverly Hills, California, el discurso de Winfrey, que fue recibido con una ovación de pie, enardeció, encapsuló el estado de ánimo de “Yo también” en un atípicamente poderoso Globo de Oro. La noche, usualmente una reservada para fiestas más despreocupadas, sirvió como la respuesta más completa de Hollywood a los escándalos de acoso sexual que han sacudido a la industria cinematográfica y descubierto sus desigualdades de género.

Con una mirada cortante, la presentadora Natalie Portman siguió el discurso de Winfrey presentando, como ella dijo, los nominados como “los mejores” para el mejor director.

La película que muchos creen habla más directamente al momento actual – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”, sobre una madre que vengó la violación y el asesinato de su hija – surgió como la mejor película de la noche. Ganó la mejor película, el drama, la mejor actriz, el drama, por Frances McDormand, el mejor actor de reparto por Sam Rockwell y el mejor guión para el escritor y director Martin McDonagh.

Al aceptar su premio, McDormand le concedió que estaba confundida con las identidades de la Asociación de Prensa Extranjera de Hollywood, pero les dio crédito. “Al menos lograron elegir a una presidenta”, dijo. Ella agregó que la noche de hecho tenía una sensación especial.

“Créanme, las mujeres de esta sala esta noche no están aquí por la comida”, dijo McDormand.

El anfitrión Seth Meyers abrió la noche sumergiéndose directamente en el material sobre los escándalos sexuales. “Buenas noches damas y caballeros restantes”, comenzó. En punchlines sobre Weinstein – “el elefante no en la habitación” – Kevin Spacey y los sesgos de género más profundos de Hollywood, Meyers anotó risas en todo el salón de baile, y tal vez una sensación de liberación.

“Para los nominados masculinos en la sala de esta noche, esta es la primera vez en tres meses que no será aterrador escuchar su nombre leído en voz alta”, dijo Meyers.

El primer premio de la noche, tal vez convenientemente, fue para una de las mujeres más poderosas de Hollywood: Nicole Kidman, por su actuación en “The Big Little Lies” de HBO, una serie que ella y Reese Witherspoon también produjeron. Kidman atribuyó el triunfo al “poder de la mujer”.

“Big Little Lies” ganó cuatro premios principales, incluidas las mejores series limitadas y la mejor actriz de reparto por Laura Dern. Al igual que otras siete estrellas, Dern caminó por la alfombra roja con una activista por los derechos de las mujeres como parte de un esfuerzo para mantener a los Globos en el punto de mira entrenados en el acoso sexual. A Dern se unieron la defensora de los trabajadores agrícolas Monica Ramirez, Michelle Williams con Tarana Burke, fundadora de “Me Too”, y Meryl Streep con la defensora de trabajadoras domésticas Ai-jen Poo.

“Que les enseñemos a todos nuestros hijos que hablar sin temor a represalias es nuestra nueva Estrella del Norte”, dijo Dern, aceptando su Globe.

Otros ganadores continuaron con el tema. Recientemente debutó en Amazon “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”, sobre una ama de casa de los años 50 que interpreta comedia stand-up, ganó la mejor serie de televisión y la mejor actriz para Rachel Brosnahan. Elisabeth Moss, aceptando un premio por su actuación en “The Handmaid’s Tale” de Hulu, dedicó su premio en forma conmovedora a Margaret Atwood, cuyo libro se basa en el programa. “The Handmaid’s Tale” más tarde agregó el premio a la mejor serie de televisión, drama.

“Ya no vivimos en los espacios en blanco en el borde de la impresión”, dijo Moss, haciendo referencia a la prosa de Atwood. “Ya no vivimos en las brechas entre las historias. Somos las historias impresas y estamos escribiendo las historias nosotros mismos”.

La temporada de premios de Hollywood se ve como abierta. Y aunque los Globos tienen poca relación con los Oscar, un puñado de películas salieron con grandes triunfos. La historia de la madre e hija de Greta Gerwig “Lady Bird” ganó la mejor película, comedia o musical, y la mejor actriz de Saoirse Ronan. La fantasía de Guillermo del Toro, de la era de la Guerra Fría, “La forma del agua” ganó por su puntuación y la dirección de Del Toro. El emotivo cineasta nacido en México se enjugó las lágrimas y logró calmar la música que lo alentaba.

Notablemente se quedaron con las manos vacías fueron “Dunkirk” de Christopher Nolan, la sensación de horror “Get Out” de Jordan Peele y “The Post” de Steven Spielberg, protagonizada por Tom Hanks y Meryl Streep. En la parte superior del programa, Meyers aludió a la buena fe de la película de Spielberg en la temporada de premios, fingió presentar un montón de Globos antes de que comenzara el show.

Los Globos habían sido durante mucho tiempo los pioneros del magnate deshonrado Weinstein, cuya caída precipitó las acusaciones contra James Toback, Spacey y muchos otros. Weinstein presidió más de dos décadas de ganadores de los Globos y fue bien conocido por su hábil manipulación de la asociación de prensa de 89 miembros.

Aunque se anuncia a sí mismo como la fiesta más grande de Hollywood, los Globos de Oro tuvieron un tono un poco más formal, parecido al de un Oscar, con momentos de apreciación por las leyendas del cine. Kirk Douglas, de 101 años, que apareció con su nuera, Catherin Zeta-Jones, recibió una cálida ovación.

El mejor actor en una comedia o musical fue para James Franco por su actuación como el infame cineasta “The Room” Tommy Wiseau. Franco arrastró a su coprotagonista y hermano, Dave, al escenario y llamó a Wiseau. Cuando el Wiseau, con sus gafas de sol de marca registrada, subió al escenario, se movió hacia el micrófono antes de que Franco lo rechazara. “Whoa, whoa, whoa”, dijo Franco mientras el público se reía.

Gary Oldman, considerado por algunos como el mejor corredor principal del actor, ganó para su Winston Churchill en “Darkest Hour”, superando al recién llegado Timothee Chalamet (“Llámame por tu nombre”) y Hanks.

La mejor película en idioma extranjero fue para “In the Fade” de Alemania. Allison Janney fue la mejor actriz de reparto en una comedia para el cuento “I, Tonya” de Tonya Harding. Aziz Ansari obtuvo el premio al mejor actor en una serie de comedia por su programa de Netflix “Master of None”.

La mejor película animada fue para el lanzamiento de Pixar “Coco”. El cofundador de Pixar, John Lasseter, está tomando un “año sabático de seis meses” después de reconocer los “errores” en su comportamiento laboral. Backstage, al director de Coco, Lee Unkrich, le preguntaron sobre los cambios en Pixar. “Todos podemos ser mejores”, dijo. “Hemos dado pasos y seguimos avanzando para crear arte”.

La demostración vestida de negro del domingo por la noche fue promovida por Time’s Up: una iniciativa de cientos de mujeres en la industria del entretenimiento -incluidas Streep, Williams, Dern y Winfrey- que se han unido para defender la paridad de género en puestos ejecutivos y brindar asistencia legal ayuda de defensa para víctimas de acoso sexual.

Ashley Judd, el primer gran nombre en registrar con su experiencia en Weinstein, y Salma Hayek, quien el mes pasado escribió un artículo de opinión sobre su pesadilla con Weinstein, llegaron juntas.

Fue solo otra ilustración de cómo el cálculo de “MeToo” que ha atravesado Hollywood ha dado un vuelco a la temporada de premios. Entre los nominados el domingo estaba Christopher Plummer, quien fue traído en el último minuto para borrar a Spacey de “Todo el dinero en el mundo”. Pero la noche perteneció a las mujeres.

 

Aquí están las películas y los programas de TV que recibieron los principales premios

Películas
Mejor película, drama: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Mejor película, musical o comedia: “Lady Bird”

Mejor director, película: Guillermo del Toro, “La forma del agua”

Mejor actuación de una actriz en una película, drama: Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Mejor actuación de un actor en una película, drama: Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Mejor actuación de una actriz en una película, musical o comedia: Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

Mejor actuación de un actor en una película, musical o comedia: James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”

Mejor actuación de una actriz en un papel secundario en cualquier película: Allison Janney, “Yo, Tonya”

Mejor actuación de un actor en un papel secundario en cualquier película: Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Mejor guión, película: Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Mejor película, animada: “Coco”

Mejor película, idioma extranjero: “In the Fade”

Mejor banda sonora original, película: Alexandre Desplat, “The Shape of Water”

Mejor canción original, película: “This Is Me” – “The Greatest Showman”

Televisión
Mejor serie de televisión, drama: “The Handmaid’s Tale”, Hulu

Mejor actuación de una actriz en una serie de televisión, drama: Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Mejor actuación de un actor en una serie de televisión, drama: Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”

Mejor serie de televisión, musical o comedia: “La maravillosa señora Maisel”, Amazon

Mejor actuación de una actriz en una serie de televisión, musical o comedia: Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Mejor actuación de un actor en una serie de televisión, musical o comedia: Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

Mejor serie limitada de televisión o película para televisión: “Big Little Lies”, HBO

Mejor actuación de una actriz en una serie limitada o película para televisión: Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”

Mejor actuación de un actor en una serie limitada o película para televisión: Ewan McGregor, “Fargo”

Mejor actuación de una actriz en un papel secundario en series, series limitadas o películas para televisión: Laura Dern, “Big Little Lies”

Mejor actuación de un actor en un papel secundario en series, series limitadas o películas para televisión: Alexander Skarsgard, “Big Little Lies”

Dulce Osuna has over a decade of dedicated and extensive work experience in television and radio broadcasting. Whether behind or in front of the camera, Dulce has excelled as a producer, journalist, host, anchor and radio personality. She is the co-founder and creator of Holahollywood.com, a bilingual online entertainment and lifestyle magazine.